Spring 2015:

Currently teaching Post-vernacular Composition/‘Pop Music’ gone Feral and Exploring Technologically Mediated Performance Practice through the Lens of Jacques Attali’s 1977 Text ‘Noise: The Political Economy of Music’.

1240F_Brown_Daily_Herald_editedFall 2014:

This semester I’m teaching MUSC 1240F Circuit Bending and Hardware Hacking as Musical and Artistic Expression and  MUSC 2230 Composing and Improvising with Real-Time Systems (see below for details). I’m also running the Electroacoustic Improv Ensemble.

There’s a nice review of the 1240F mid-term concert in the Brown Daily Herald, read it here and see  new 1240f and 2230 photos here and here.

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Spring 2014:

MUSC 1240G: Post-vernacular Composition/‘Pop Music’ gone Feral
This seminar explores the fertile creative territory found around the more adventurous edges of ‘popular’ musics. Drawing from both experimental and popular backgrounds, the focus is on non-notated contemporary composition, but participants are not restricted to traditional conceptualizations of the recording studio or the production of ‘fixed’ works. The idea of post-vernacular is utilized to challenge the view that vernacular or ‘popular’ musics are only oriented towards commercialism and mass popularity i.e. this seminar seeks to extend and build-upon the inherently experimental dimensions of much vernacular musical practice. Developing a comprehensive theoretical and practical knowledge of studio craft, specifically targeted towards creative recording and production techniques, is one objective. However, the main goal is to arrive at an idiosyncratic definition of post-vernacular composition, through practical exploration. Participants will respond to a number of increasingly open-ended assignments, and will complete a final portfolio. [Download syllabus as .pdf]

MUSC 2280: Designing Large-Scale Multimedia Projects
A production seminar designed for students working on a single, large project in Multimedia and/or Computer Music. The course covers planning and implementation strategies, with group critiques of proposals and works-in-progress. The class structure includes individual lessons for students working on a graduate or undergraduate thesis project. Permission will be granted based upon a questionnaire given in the first class. Enrollment is limited. [Download syllabus as .pdf]

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Fall 2013:

MUSC 1240F: Circuit Bending and Hardware Hacking as Musical and Artistic Expression
Creative experimentation with hardware electronics and re-appropriated technologies is the main focus of this course. No prior experience of electronics is required. Initially, we will build a range of simple electronic circuits and explore a variety of strategies to animate and interpret pre-existing electronic devices. Students will then develop individual instruments and/or performance environments and engage in a number of solo and collaborative projects. The aesthetics of handmade electronic music and post-digital performance practice will be foregrounded throughout. [Download syllabus as .pdf]


1240F Midterm Concert Fall 2013

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MUSC 2230 Composing and Improvising with Real-Time Systems
In probing the relationship between humans, interfaces, and sonic materials, this seminar will consider: how useful are established notions of composition and improvisation in a contemporary ‘real-time’ age? The overall aim is to develop conceptual discussion and practical experimentation, which will culminate in (at least) two concerts and a variety of web-based outputs, as well as a short piece of reflective writing. It is possible to navigate this course using a variety of software/hardware systems (Ableton Live, Max, PD, turntables, home-brew electronics, etc); a diverse approach to a variety of technologies is highly encouraged. [Download syllabus as .pdf]


1240F and 2230 Final Concerts and Installations December 2013

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[Download 1240F final concert booklet in .pdf]

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Kingston University (London, UK)


Hash Riaz, Liam Sharpe, and Selina Welter realised this project under my supervision for their final-year ‘Special Study’ at Kingston University, London. Two Nintendo Wii Remotes are utilised in combination with JunXion & Ableton Live software. These movies were captured during rehearsals for David Osbon’s Bodies in Motion 2012.

hackingKUDAC

Kingston University Digital Arts Collective (KUDAC) is a staff-led collective based in the Music Department; KUDAC’s primary agenda is to engage with the use of technology in collaborative music making, using staff research interests as a starting point for musical exploration. The collective is open-ended and student-focused, with an emphasis on music making with a technological grounding. KUDAC was launched in September 2011 by Diana Salazar, John Ferguson, Louise Harris, and Oded Ben-Tal.

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Newcastle University (North East England,  UK)

Tim Shaw’s ‘Cupboard Music’ emerged in response to a ‘hacking’ module that I lead at Newcastle University in 2009. The module  introduced circuit bending/hardware hacking, but also explored camera tracking with JunXion as a means to extend the flexibility of Ableton Live. See feature on Create Digital Music here.